5 facts and myths about 100% orange juice

An IPSOS survey1 with 2,099 European healthcare professionals (HCPs) revealed significant misconceptions about 100% orange juice, leading to an underestimation of its nutritional value. See below what’s fact and what’s fiction when it comes to the nutrient matrix in a glass of 100% orange juice.

Myth

75% of surveyed healthcare professionals wrongly believed 100% orange juice contains colourings or preservatives.1

Fact

It is prohibited by European law to add sugars to 100% fruit juice – nothing is added, nothing is taken away. This includes sugar, preservatives, colourings, stabilisers, flavourings.2

Myth

60% of surveyed healthcare professionals were unaware that 100% orange juice contains polyphenols.1

Fact

100% orange juice is also one of the richest sources of hesperidin, a polyphenol from the flavanone sub-class. Hesperidin exhibits anti-inflammatory3 characteristics and can impact positively on the elasticity and tone of blood vessels. 4

Myth

30% of surveyed healthcare professionals still don't believe that 100% orange juice can be good for their patients.1

Fact

100% orange juice nutrients carry three authorised health claims in Europe. 5 Vitamin C helps the immune system work normally, folate helps a normal psychological function, and potassium supports the maintenance of normal blood pressure and helps muscles work normally.

Myth

30% of surveyed healthcare professionals still don’t believe 100% orange juice can be good for their patients.1

Fact

Research from AMC Innova6 suggests that levels of vitamin_x001f_C in 100% orange juice remain well above the legal cut-o_x001e_ for a ‘rich in’ claim, even after refrigeration for 56 days.

Myth

A large portion of EU healthcare professionals believe that juice made from concentrate has a reduced amount of nutrients.

Fact

Vitamin C levels in 100% orange juice made from concentrate are considered ‘high’ according to EU regulations. Additionally, hesperidin and potassium levels are similar whether 100% orange juice is made from concentrate or is freshly squeezed.7

DISCLAIMER: Every e_x001e_ ort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this document is reliable and has been verified. The information is intended to be used as a basis for non-commercial communications to a professional audience of healthcare professionals and media only. Information contained in this document should not be used as nutrition or health claims in communication directly targeting consumers. Users of this document should be aware that the use of this information in a di_x001e_ erent context as indicated or modifications of the information such as changes in the wordings, omissions or additions, as well as adding pictorials can have legal consequences. The AIJN shall therefore have no liability whatsoever for any loss or damage resulting from the use of this document or the information contained herein. The AIJN does not guarantee the accuracy of or endorse the views or opinions expressed by third parties on this document, and expressly disclaims any and all liability resulting from reliance on such information or opinions.

References

[1] Ruxton C (2018)

What do Europe’s health professionals think about fruit juice? CN Focus 10: 36-38.

[3] Rocha DMUP et al. (2017)

Orange juice modulates proinflammatory cytokines after high-fat saturated meal consumption. Food Funct 8: 4396-4403.

[4] Morand C et al. (2011)

Hesperidin contributes to the vascular protective e ects of orange juice: a randomized crossover study in healthy volunteers. Am J Clin Nutr 93: 73–80.

[6] Kindly provided by Dr Mari Cruz Arcas, AMC, Murcia, Spain.

[7] Data provided by SGF International (2018).